Behind the Scenes of OK Go's Red Star Macalline Commercial

OK Go have always been famous for their crafted and extremely complex music videos. This time, they made a commercial for a big Chinese furniture store all shot as a single steadicam take and full of optical illusions and practical effects.

Rental company KitSplit reached out to us with this BTS video, where they show a tiny piece of the month and a half of preparation, two weeks of rehearsal, and one day of shooting. The song they've used was a remix of OK Go's "I Won’t Let You Down." The video has been made on a steadicam where the operator had to be so precise at moments that he had to be on the right spot within two inches. It was shot on a 5K RED Dragon and a Canon 17-120 Cine-Servo lens. That lens was used because of the push-pull effect at the end of the video after which they've nailed the rest of the optical illusions and all in-camera practical effects. The steadicam operator admits he practiced that shot for two weeks. Check out the finished product below:

A particularly interesting part of the video is the rotating room, where two of the band members look like they're defying the laws of physics. In this shot, the camera was rotating with the room, while it looked like the guys were walking on the walls and the ceiling. You can see how they locked the operator on a custom built crane-like construction, and no, they didn't rotate him. If you look closely, they've put the camera on a special head that allowed a remote operator to rotate it to match the rotation speed of the set:

BTS of OK Go's Red Star Macalline Commercial

What do you think of the commercial? Was it worth the effort?

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12 Comments

Their videos are always dope. And they keep up to their audience's expectations ... which I find quite hard to do every time you thought they pushed the limit further.

Tihomir Lazarov's picture

And never get old. If you check the date of the commercial, it's from 2015.

jonas y's picture

Very creative production, thank you for sharing.

Tihomir Lazarov's picture

You're welcome Jonas. Thanks for commenting

jonas y's picture

After the comment, I went through these two videos multiple times. This is truly inspirational, great article.

Tihomir Lazarov's picture

Hah :) Yeah. I've learned probably a third of my skills from BTS materials.

Ansel Spear's picture

What's with all this reaching out stuff?

Tihomir Lazarov's picture

Mutual benefits. Sending an article suggestion from the Fstoppers.com contact form sometimes can end up as an article as this one.

Ansel Spear's picture

I meant the expression, not the purpose. I don't really get this 'reaching out' phrase. The more usual 'contacted us' is simpler and a more accurate description of the action being performed. Reaching out implies a desperate plea for help.

Tihomir Lazarov's picture

As a non-native speaker, I found out this expression has been used a lot between English-speaking people. I usually don't use it when I communicate with English-speaking people. Decided to use it as a synonym. Obviously doesn't evoke the same associations as I thought.

Ansel Spear's picture

I certainly wasn't criticising your excellent language skills. I was commenting on this annoying lingo-trend that seems to be sweeping the communication airwaves at the moment.

Tihomir Lazarov's picture

And I do appreciate that. These kinds of expressions have been smuggled into many languages.