Why Instagram is Crucial to Lead Generation for Photographers

Why Instagram is Crucial to Lead Generation for Photographers

There is a lot of debate within the photo community on the importance of a social media presence. As social media has increasingly evolved as an essential in daily life, it’s time for photographers to stop fighting against the current. No matter your niche, there is value in participating in an online presence. Instagram is a particularly important tool for photographers to generate leads.

Editors, Agencies, and Scouts

Believe it or not, some people truly are discovered off of Instagram. Editors, agents, and scouts are active on social media on a daily basis. They are looking for hidden gems, the next undiscovered talent in their niche. They are looking for you, so let them find you! Refinery29 photo director Toby Kaufmann described Instagram to EE Photo Group, saying, “It's a feast. I am working on a longer-term project and there was a very specific type of photographer I was looking for. I did it through hashtags, then reached out via DM..." Curating an active and thoughtful presence on social media is a huge opportunity to create leads.

Higher Engagement Shows That Your Work Resonates with a Large Audience

High engagement on your Instagram takes time to build, but it’s worth the effort. Showing that your work has high engagement is proof in numbers that your work resonates with a large audience. When your next client stumbles upon your page, they’re going to want to hire you, someone they can trust to produce a crowd pleaser. That being said, we know that just because a photographer’s follower count is high doesn’t necessarily mean that their work is the most technically proficient–– but it sure speaks to a lot of people.

Showcase Consistency in Your Branding and Image Quality

A consistent brand or “aesthetic” often pairs with an engaged audience. Just like when you’re showcasing your work to clients, you want them to know exactly what they are getting with you. A major factor in that is consistency. Instagram allows you the opportunity to curate a visually pleasing brand image that lets clients know your style, and what your work is all about. Just like a portfolio book or site, if the image quality and consistency aren’t there, it’s not likely to generate as much interest.

Marketing Tool for Finding Potential Clients, No Matter Your Niche

No matter what niche or market you’re working in, Instagram’s platform gives you access to millions of people who are definitely interested in what you do. For smaller niches, it takes a little longer to find and develop your audience, but once you have them, the chance to retain their interest and business becomes easy.

Instagram Tips for Photographers

Localizing your Instagram with hashtags and locations can introduce you to paying customers in your area.

Local Tagging Generates Local Clientele

If you are working in a local market, local tagging is everything to building a base of real, paying customers. Find local hashtags and use them to your advantage. So many people are looking for their wedding photographers, family photographers, and more through #LOCATIONweddingphotographer #LOCATIONwedding. Another crucial detail: location tagging. People who are looking to shoot or hold an event at a particular spot are looking at location tags to see what it looks like, and they wind up on your page because you captured exactly what they’re looking for. Localizing your Instagram also arms you with the opportunity to connect with local creatives, vendors and more to collaborate and cross-promote.

Generate Photography Leads with Instagram

Instagram is a highly valuable tool to generate leads for photographers. Building an online presence overall is crucial to booking clients, so why wouldn’t the largest visual platform available be important, too? Elevate your brand with a curated, consistent Instagram presence and let your prospective clientele find you.

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58 Comments

Amp Lighter's picture

One maybe forgetting the fact that when someone like myself post an image on instagram, the image can't be stolen with the right click save option. However it still can be copied via the "print screen". Knowing this, I've been given a place to showcase my work without having someone steal it. So for me, it's safer place to display my work. So far the only persons that's been discovering my page, are those whom want to sell me something or bots which latch onto a particular phase I've added to the image.

John Horwitz's picture

There is also a program called 'SnapNDrag' ~ it steals your images even easier. Someone stole a framed print of mine right off of a gallery wall once. Not sure if it was an insult or compliment.

"Someone stole a framed print of mine right off of a gallery wall once. Not sure if it was an insult or compliment."

Oddly, that made me feel nostalgic for old school thieves willing to get their hands dirty.

Tom Lew's picture

Here's a direct link to your latest instagram post:

https://scontent-lga3-1.cdninstagram.com/vp/f308a3db761569982b81a85b4a3b...

All you have to do is right click on your image, choose view source, and cntrl F or command F search for ".jpg" and there's the link. Takes only a few seconds.

Amp Lighter's picture

Nice that you've discovered one of my oil paintings based on a blurry black & white photograph. Didn't say the system was flawless.. I guess the best way to not have your images stolen, is not post them online.

Krzysztof Kurzaj's picture

Current maximum resolution for Instagram is 1080 x 1080 pixels which roughly translate to 1.1 megapixels. Images obtained from Instagram are not usable for any serious reproduction work nor sale because their quality is simply shit (pardon me my French). In other words, Instagram is probably the safest way to post your work giving viewers just enough of the idea of what you do and how you do it.

Amp Lighter's picture

I've since closed my instagram profile as I've just created a private server for my art & photography only accessible for friends and family.

Tom Lew's picture

Dang sorry dude!

Krzysztof Kurzaj's picture

OK, you can do that of course. Except you are clearly not getting much new exposure from this setup.

John Horwitz's picture

This is so far from my truth; glad to see it works for you though.

Sean Conroy's picture

What is 'the truth' then?

John Horwitz's picture

The 'TRUTH' is that a keyboard is your buy-in. Not a high bar by any means. Look for the comments about how many other so-called 'platforms' have come and gone and you will see why this is trendy and doomed to fail.

The 'TRUTH' is that if this really worked, many more would be successful by the very utilization.

The 'Truth' is: Photography has never been a profession, it has, is and always will be a trade. Those who succeed do so by hard work, developing the skills necessary to run all aspects of a business from accounting to sweeping the studio at night.

Social media is fun but it will never replace a one-on-one meeting with a customer. And once you gain that customer, it is important to look for repeat business and referrals.

What images on any instagram page are memorable, does anything in the bio/artists statement make a person stand out, are they a candidate to document any part of my life ~ there is nothing 'intimate' or of value that I have seen. And I have no burning desire to scroll through billions of overly photoshopped images to find the one of value.

I did the same thing with Flickr for years. There is nothing unique about Instagram that makes me want to spend a great deal of time putting content on it.

John Horwitz's picture

and MySpace, Facebook, Imgur, TinyPic., Use, 500px, SmugMug, not even BNC. Linkedin is OK though.

Nick, Flickr isn't dead yet, and despite the pronouncements by some there are a number of photographers who still ply their trade on Flickr. I can still search for photos on Flickr through Google which is how I got "discovered".

For a number of us Instagram is nothing more than a necessary evil. I post on it because people expect it. It doesn't make it a great platform for photos, popular is not always good.

Aaron B.'s picture

Well thats the glory of Instagram. It really doesn't take much time to put up said content (depending on your wishes).

Lenzy Ruffin's picture

I'm glad Instagram is working for you. But to say that it's "crucial for lead generation for photographers" is an absurd, irresponsible, and tired narrative that ignores mountains of evidence to the contrary.

A person can follow all the guidelines for Instagram success and still never generate one thin dime from all their efforts. Zero dollars in revenue is what the overwhelming majority of photographers will make from Instagram, regardless of the level of time, money, and effort they put into it.

Instagram marketing has been discussed on Fstoppers for years. The dream of hashtagging your way to revenue has been sold for years and bought by many of us who now know better. Many of us have bought into the advice you're suggesting and thought we were doing something wrong when it didn't work for us. Then, we talk to each other and realize that it works for almost no one.

I really am glad that Instagram works for you, but an article like this sets up the overwhelming majority of people who believe it to waste A TON of time on something that's never going to yield a single client for them.

I spent a couple of years trying to figure out Instagram in earnest and got nowhere. My results are far more typical than yours. In contrast, I spent about thirty minutes designing a gift certificate to donate to schools for their annual auction (I'm a family portrait photographer) and I've gotten four-figure clients from it who recommend me to people like themselves.

Instagram is "a" way for "some" photographers to get clients, as is every other marketing strategy. But to write that it's crucial just ignores the reality of the data. Some people win Powerball. That doesn't make it a sound investment strategy.

Nico Socha's picture

I agree, I also know a lot of good photographers who shoot big campaigns and have 1000 - 2000 followers only. The success of a photographer is not related to their Instagram followers. Big clients always work with their lead agency and they have their own way to find a new photographer maybe sometimes via Instagram but that is really rare.

The best ways to get a photo production is in my opinion:

- Recommendation via existing clients
- Representative
- High-Quality Marketing (Like Portfolio Book)
- Fairs
- Editorial publications in magazines

Michael B. Stuart's picture

By no means is this article irresponsible. Advice is everywhere and we choose which deserves our time and effort.
I think too many of us carry the crazy notion towards social media that "I posted regularly and it didn't work so success isn't possible." Instagram is one of the many avenues to get noticed and get ahead, but that doesn't mean it's easy or automatic. As the old "your results may vary" saying goes, we've given away a number of gift certificates for basket auctions and gotten very little return.
I also agree with Nico that the number of followers isn't nearly as important as what you are able to do with those followers.

Lenzy Ruffin's picture

We may end up just disagreeing on this because I do believe it is irresponsible to write that "Instagram is crucial for lead generation" when for the overwhelming majority of photographers, it will do no such thing.

What Instagram has the potential to do and the results that someone can reasonably expect from Instagram are two different extremes. This article only addresses one of those extremes. There's millions of people on one extreme and a relative handful enjoying success at the other.

I never said it would be easy or automatic. And I certainly didn't say it was not possible. I never even suggested any "crazy notion" about social media success not being possible. If you're going to reply to someone's comment, you should be responding to the views that they expressed, not the views of "too many of us..."

I put a lot of time and effort into Instagram, and some money, as have many others. Instagram is not the lead generator that this article is presenting it to be. Precious few people are able to generate business via Instagram, relative the the number who try. And I'm talking about people who really try.

Someone new is trying their hand at earning a living through photography every day and those people come to sites like Fstoppers for advice. This advice that WAY oversells what one can reasonably expect from Instagram is irresponsible.

Regarding the school auctions, I never presented it as "crucial for lead generation", I just cited it as an example of something that worked for me. I didn't oversell it as a marketing strategy the way this article oversells Instagram in every single paragraph.

Words matter. If this article had presented Instagram without way overselling its effectiveness, I wouldn't have commented. Instagram is not crucial for lead generation. For most people, it will do no such thing.

Michael B. Stuart's picture

I was genuine in including myself in the "crazy notion" i.e. https://fstoppers.com/originals/why-us-average-joe-photographers-suck-in...
In mentioning the gift certificates I was simply offering a contrasting view on what worked for you. There are people finding success using Instagram. I would also suggest photographers use it.

Juan carlos Chu Zhang's picture

i have only 1.2k followers but most of them are local i alredy make a lot of bookings thanks to instagram .

>> I'm glad Instagram is working for you. But to say that it's "crucial for lead generation for photographers" is an absurd, irresponsible, and tired narrative that ignores mountains of evidence to the contrary.<<

It's just clickbait writing - a very bad habit to have.

Sacha Martin's picture

Interesting! Does someone know any good hashtag to get found by clients?

Mark Niebauer's picture

Another total BS article. Instagram does practically nothing.

John Horwitz's picture

looked at her instagram page...wondered why there were so many photos of her?

Megan Breukelman's picture

Hi John! Thanks for taking the time to look at my personal feed. However, you're missing the bigger picture not only of the article, but the experience behind it as I manage not just my personal feed but multiple brands on Instagram.

John Horwitz's picture

Hi Megan,

Thank you for taking the time to write a thoughtful reply. I so love the interaction of social discourse especially when it is in the public purview.

Since you feel I missed something, I desire your full and complete explanation of the motives and merits of your pages and the overall mission of your work.

Many of my 'customers' were garnered from the hundreds of gallery and museum shows I did over a twelve year period. In that time, I also had a social media presence, but that attracted a younger crowd, who, while interested in my work were either unwilling or unable to afford it.

I think, but am not sure, that you would be called an 'influencer'? The style is indeed interesting, but it seems to appeal to a younger, less affluent group, - yes?

Looking forward to your reply, and best of luck to you.

John

I see what you did there, John. (Good job!)

Seriously, however; I'm completely on board with the majority of detractors posting replies to this article. Social media approaches to marketing are attempts to gain market share by sheer volume; but as necessitated by the model, for penny margins while swimming in red water territory.

I made a decision early on that I was going base my business approach regarding my photography passion in such a way that should I succeed, I would do so WHILE remaining satisfied, passionate and happy in the process. For me that meant to never get on board the "social media" train. It means for now keeping my day job. The clients I work for are not "jobs," but collaborations and partnerships where we both are highly satisfied with the process. Their referrals are worth infinitely more than a million hits or views.

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