Photojournalistic

The Robotic Cameras Of The 2012 Olympic Games And Beyond

The progression of technology has allowed for us to capture shots in angles that we would not usually be able to capture. Robotic cameras have the ability to fit into spaces and locations that a photographer would usually not be able to get to. These are fully controlled by remote as well. It may very well begin to change the landscape of photojournalism. Check out what you can expect and how it's done within.

Unseen 1980s Photos of Staten Island by Christine Osinski

Photographer Christine Osinski took these images of Staten Island in 1983 and 1984. Back then she was shooting with a Linhoff lens on a 4×5 camera. I'll admit, my experience in Staten Island is limited to a few rides on the ferry. But there is something so captivating about this series. These are ordinary people, living their lives in what could be any town in America. But they are in fact, residents of New York City's 'forgotten borough.'

How Cropping In Camera Can Improve Your Wedding Photography

Many photographers start off their careers focusing on wedding photography. I started my career as a wedding photographer in Charleston, and I still enjoy shooting a handful each year. Over the next few months, I hope to share some of my thoughts on wedding photography and how event photographers can improve their photos. Today I was reminded how important "In Camera Cropping" is for emotionally charged photographs. Read the full post to see two examples of how cropping can make or break an image.

Behind the Scenes: James Mollison Shoots Portraits at a Kenyan Refugee Camp

James Mollison is known for his photojournalistic portraiture. He often photographs his subjects in front of a white backdrop, and then presents the final portrait next to a picture of the persons's living conditions. In this video, he'll speak about his previous projects; but you'll also get see him in action. He goes to a Kenyan refugee camp and captures some beautiful and somewhat disheartening images of the inhabitants.

New York Photos From The 1960's

Ernst Haas is an Austrian photographer who began shooting color film in it's infancy. The photographs posted here were taken in New York state during the late 1950's and 1960's. Check out Ernst's website for a massive and downright impressive collection of film street photography and early Hollywood portraits. Enjoy!

[Video] The Making of Inspiring Documentaries

Ken Burns is somewhat of a a legend when it comes to stories and film making. His documentaries cover some fantastic issues within the U.S. and have a fine tension throughout the film which keeps his audience captivated. In this short interview by Redglass Pictures, Ken shares what he feels the key elements of a captivating story are. How do you think his idea of that "extra element" applies to what you shoot or edit?

[News] You Break It, You Bought It

Below is a selection from a New York Post article that I read earlier this week. At first I laughed at the reality of a photographer being so careless around an ancient piece of art. The laughing stopped pretty quickly though once i thought "What if I had done this and had a lawsuit hanging over my head".

[Pics] Striking Images of a Team of Acrobats

A recent TIME article highlighted the growing sport referred to as "acro," which is acrobatics and tumbling. The article explains that these athletes are striving to be taken more seriously. The sport is looking to distance itself from cheerleading, and the photos needed to show just that. Photographer Holly Andres went to the University of Oregon to capture images for the story. Her approach was